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20130121
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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
know. do you know it would be ground hog day, that's a great movie, howard ramus and bill murray. >> rose: yes. rolling stones summed your philosophy, they said. this is the magazine. s this 1985 song that's why i'm here. fortune and pain such a curious gain, perfect stranger can call you by name. pay money to hear fire and rain again and again and again. i break into a grin are from year to year and suddenly it's perfectly clear that's why i'm here. does that speak to you? >> well yes, that's another one of those sort of self declamatory song where one is at any gin ment. that song has three verses. the first one is that one's about the audience. and you know some are like, some are coming back every year. baby in their blanket and their bucket of beer. that's my audience on the lawn in the summertime i break into a grin, etcetera. but the one before that was of song, you know, the verse about love and then the first one was about friendship. and you know so it's a song, the chorus is that's why i'm here. >> rose: it seems to me there's a theme running through your life that s
to budget chair murray. we're going to do a budget this year. and it's going to have revenues in it. and our republican colleagues better get used to that fact. >> senator cruz? >> david, i'll mention there was an area of substantial agreement with what chuck just said. he said we should never, ever compromise the full faith and credit of the united states. i agree. and in fact, there is a bill that i am co-sponsoring, the full faith and credit act, which provides that, regardless of what happens to the debt ceiling, the united states will always, always, always meet its debt. we will never default on its debt. that was introduced in 2010. it didn't pass because harry reid and president obama didn't want it to pass. they wanted to raise the specter of a default to use. so, chuck, you and i could make news right now on national television, would you agree to support the full faith and credit act and take the possibility of a default off the table? >> i support the mcconnell proposal. let us raise the debt ceiling. no strings attached. and if the president can raise it as he should be able to
. on domestic issues, it was simple. i was a great society liberal. then i read charles murray, "losing ground," and for someone who is wanted doctor, i am open to empirical evidence. it was a dallas -- it was a disaster. i began to change on domestic policy and i realize that, however good the intentions of american liberalism and it was destroying a whole sector of society and destroying the lives, the culture, the resolve, the character of the people it wanted to help. so that is how it happened. they moved on domestic affairs and i moved and i am where i am now. of course, that is a long way to say that i was young once. [laughter] >> q u concern note -- you consider yourself a new conservative? is that a term that is used anymore? >> know. it is now an epithet. it was -- there was wanted someone had a meeting. -- a meaning. today it's usually meant as a nym for jewish conservatism. whenever you hear the word, i challenge the person to describe and explain to you what a new icon is and i guarantee you they will have no answer. it used to mean somebody who was once a level and became more
partnership with senate majority leader rodney tom and minority leader ed murray, and with house speaker frank chopp and minority leader richard debolt. i want us to collaborate early legislature already to begin need to talk to you about the future of our state. when the people of yakima senti sat and listened as former washington's second century. he said "either we respond to international competition, or we doom ourselves and our children to a dramatic slide to second-rate status in the world." we chose to answer this challenge, with a unique formula for international success that has made us who we are today, with businesses, entrepreneurs, state government, all working economy was brought low by the gross irresponsibility by those on wall street. as a result we have suffered 4 years of recession, with almost 300,000 people in washington looking for work. too many of our families are on the brink of losing their home. parents lie awake at night wondering how they can provide for their children's future. but we remain an optimistic state, a visionary state and an innovative state. time has
they will put forward a budget proposal, chuck schumer and patty murray and others are saying there will be new revenue in it. talk to mitch mcconnell said it's settled based on the raising of rates from the fiscal cliff deal, so there are some real divisions. and monday seems like a long, long time ago already. >> it certainly does. >> joe? >> yeah, mike. >> pick up on sam stein's point about immigration. today is a red-letter day on that issue. two signal events. one in today's "wall street journal," jeb bush, former florida governor, calls for comprehensive immigration reform. that's what the president wants. that's what democrats are pushing for and what republicans are resisting. jeb bush, one of the most powerful voices in the party, said they should go the president's way on that. fix it in a big bill. second, sam stein's colleague, john war, points out on huff post that marco rubio, florida senator, is very smartly trying to change the vocabulary of this debate, detoxify the term amnesty which has allowed talk radio, conservatives to dismiss almost any move on immigration. he's saying w
at how people live, we just do live in two different countries. i think that charles murray's book last year was a very powerful way of laying that out. >> but this is a very peculiar problem that we face. we all talk about this. i think we are all along about it, even if you are not a hard- line social conservative. yet, what we do not see -- what we have not seen are the social dislocation costs of this. that is to say, when we started "the weekly standard" in 1995, the prognostic of peace that would make you laugh if you went back to look at it was by a criminologist and sociologists called "here come the super predators." the argument was we had created a generation of 17-year-old youth whose fathers had been in prison, who had never seen a strong family, and basically, they were on the way to creating a crime wave the likes of which we had never seen. that is one of the great humbling moments of my life as an editor. it is a wonderful piece. it was perfectly argued, and it made absolute sense at the time that we publish it, and it was so wildly wrong. it is not 18 years later. we h
anymore. on domestic issues, it was simple. i was a great society liberal. then i read charles murray, "losing ground," and for someone who is wanted doctor, i am open to empirical evidence. it was a dallas -- it was a disaster. i began to change on domestic policy and i realize that, however good the intentions of american liberalism and it was destroying a whole sector of society and destroying the lives, the culture, the resolve, the character of the people it wanted to help. so that is how it happened. they moved on domestic affairs and i moved and i am where i am now. of course, that is a long way to say that i was young once. [laughter] >> q u concern note -- you consider yourself a new conservative? is that a term that is used anymore? >> know. it is now an epithet. it was -- there was wanted someone had a meeting. -- a meaning. today it's usually meant as a silent synonym for jewish conservatism. whenever you hear the word, i challenge the person to describe and explain to you what a new icon is and i guarantee you they will have no answer. it used to mean somebody who was on
sure we meet compelling human need and at the same time get value for our dollar. senator patty murray chairs the subcommittee that funds housing and transportation, again, to make sure that we're rebuilding homes and livelihoods. senator feinstein on the army corps of engineers, again, while they've been doing a heroic job getting the -- keeping the mississippi river open, they want to make sure the shoreline of new york and new jersey and maryland is open for business as well. i could name all of them but those three have done an outstanding job. and i particularly want to acknowledge the help of my colleagues from new york and new jersey. senator schumer has led the way, particularly when there was this difficult time with senator inouye's illness to move this bill. but senator gillibrand, menendez and lautenberg have really been outstanding. this is about colleagues, and i want to thank our colleagues on the other side of the aisle who helped us. i know that -- i really would now like to yield the floor to senator landrieu, who has done such a great job through her subcommittee and
countries. i think charles murray's book last year lays it out. >> we all talk about this and we are alarmed about it. see, thewe don't social dislocation costs of this. when we started the weekly standard in 1995, a very good piece but it will make you laugh if you go back and look at>> bu. the argument was that we had created a generation of 17-year- old whose fathers had been in prison, they had never seen a strong family. they were on their way to creating a crime wave the likes of which we had never seen. that is one of the great humbling moments of my life as an editor. it was a wonderful piece that was perfectly argued and it made sense at the time that we published it. it was so wildly wrong that 18 years later, we have lived through a decline in crime. not one person was killed last week in new york city. that has not happened. someone mispronounced my name that i was taught him. part of the difficulty is that when we talk about this and we look at this horrible trend upon us, it has been upon us for 40 years and most social indices that we can look at suggest that the country is st
country. i think charles murray's book last year was very powerful way of laying out how it is spent this is a very peculiar problem that we face because we all talk about this. i think we're all of him had even if you're not a hardline social conservative. you safe information. and yet we don't see, what we haven't seen, charles alluded to this lastly, are the social dislocation talks of this. that is to say, when we started "the weekly standard" in 1995, the worst, very good piece, but would make you laugh if you would like to look at it was by a criminologist and sociologist was called here come the super predators. and the argument was that we had created a generation of 17-year-olds, youth, whose fathers had been in prison, never seen a strong family, none of that. and basically they were on the way to creating a crime wave the likes of which we had never seen. that is one of the great humbling moments of my life as an editor. wonderful piece, perfectly argued and it made absolute sense at the time that we published it. and it was so wildly wrong that it's not 18 years later. yo
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)